Common Flowers for an Uncommon Bloom Day

Tara always instructs having a view on axis from your window. I was snapping fresh beans the other day and looked up to see this Crape Myrtle in bloom  through the glass paned door of my porch, first I’d noticed that any except white was in bloom.

I thought we had many Crape Myrtles until I read that Mr. Gibbs has 240 in one area at his place and a total of more than 1000. I might root and plant 200 but the maintenance would be more than I could manage.

Under the White Crape Myrtle I planted Pandora’s Box Daylily,
Purple Heart, Persian Shield and chartreuse Alternanthera.
We still have Gardenias blooming.
Vitex, blooming in the Front Garden with Carefree Delight Roses.
Agapanthus are just starting to bloom with a background of Blue Hydrangeas.
Big Blue Hydrangeas follow Oakleaf Hydranges which have reached the stage where they look pinkish and then turn tan. Echinacea is blooming everywhere.
This is the first Angel Trumpet (Brugmansia) to bloom.
At night their ballerina skirts open
to reveal incredible fragrance.
Kniphofia and Lilies and Daylilies, a sampler

 



Almost every house between here and town has yellow Lantana. It blooms nonstop until frost and butterflies love it and the white and lavender forms too.

This was a whirlwind tour and we didn’t even visit the Upper Garden. I hope you’ll visit often. Happy Bloom Day.

Bloom Day originates at Carol’s May Dreams Gardens. Join the fun.

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4 Comments

  1. I like to grow yellow lantana in containers, but here it is only a little annual.

  2. The picture of the Gardenia blossom is wonderful and the Angel Trumpet is a great color! There’s nothing like the smell of Gardenia’s here in the NE.

  3. I love the “ballerina skirts”…amazing nature in all it’s beauty!…and you seem to be a wonderful caretaker to all!

    • Nell Jean

       /  June 15, 2014

      The ballerina skirts are even more beautiful at night when they open into wide trumpets and produce a marvelous perfume in order to attract pollinators.

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